Sharing your Alarm Clock Settings and Interaction

We recently discussed more ideas on sharing alarm clock settings and sharing of the interaction with the alarm clock. Conceptually we have created a design some years back: the networked alarm clock that we published at the 3AD conference [1]. 2008 there was a interesting paper at CSCW that look in more detail what such designs can enable for group communication [2].

As many people (and I heard that the most used function on a phone is the alarm clock) use their phone as their alarm clock it could be the right time to put some of these idea into reality…

[1] Schmidt, A. 2006. Network alarm clock (The 3AD International Design Competition). Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 10, 2-3 (Jan. 2006), 191-192. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-005-0022-y

[2] Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., and Abowd, G. D. 2008. Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (San Diego, CA, USA, November 08 – 12, 2008). CSCW ’08. ACM, New York, NY, 619-628. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1460563.1460660

Sharing your Alarm Clock Settings and Interaction

We recently discussed more ideas on sharing alarm clock settings and sharing of the interaction with the alarm clock. Conceptually we have created a design some years back: the networked alarm clock that we published at the 3AD conference [1]. 2008 there was a interesting paper at CSCW that look in more detail what such designs can enable for group communication [2].

As many people (and I heard that the most used function on a phone is the alarm clock) use their phone as their alarm clock it could be the right time to put some of these idea into reality…

[1] Schmidt, A. 2006. Network alarm clock (The 3AD International Design Competition). Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 10, 2-3 (Jan. 2006), 191-192. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-005-0022-y

[2] Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., and Abowd, G. D. 2008. Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (San Diego, CA, USA, November 08 – 12, 2008). CSCW ’08. ACM, New York, NY, 619-628. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1460563.1460660

>Sharing your Alarm Clock Settings and Interaction

>We recently discussed more ideas on sharing alarm clock settings and sharing of the interaction with the alarm clock. Conceptually we have created a design some years back: the networked alarm clock that we published at the 3AD conference [1]. 2008 there was a interesting paper at CSCW that look in more detail what such designs can enable for group communication [2].

As many people (and I heard that the most used function on a phone is the alarm clock) use their phone as their alarm clock it could be the right time to put some of these idea into reality…

[1] Schmidt, A. 2006. Network alarm clock (The 3AD International Design Competition). Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 10, 2-3 (Jan. 2006), 191-192. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-005-0022-y

[2] Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., and Abowd, G. D. 2008. Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (San Diego, CA, USA, November 08 – 12, 2008). CSCW ’08. ACM, New York, NY, 619-628. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1460563.1460660

Getting back to Europe, Remote teaching

Due to the volcanic activity in Iceland (and the resulting cancellation of many flights) I was a few days longer in North America than planned. I stayed in Toronto and looked at different options to get home – in short Europe is far away from the North America :-) much further than we typically experience it when we planes are flying.

Here are some options that I explored:

  • looking for a place on a container ship, takes about 7-12 days (does not really work as the capacity of transatlantic ship with regard to transporting people is extremely low – my estimate is 100 people/week – does this sound right?)
  • booking a transatlantic cruise, takes about 7-15 days (very few spaces available, only every few weeks available)
  • flying via the middle east (e.g. Doha, Dubai, Cairo, Istanbul …) and than taking bus/car/train/ship to get back to Germany – seemed feasible (cheap flights were available) but the land journey takes long (e.g. from Turkey to Germany it about 40h).
  • flying to Moscow and taking the train(pretty straightforward ;-)

In the end I waited, got a stand-by space on a direct flight to Frankfurt on Wednesday, and did the teaching via Skype and Google-Talk and had a nice day in Toronto :-) (Fotos from Facebook and probably taken by Jan Gerbecks and Ali)

I had a discussion with Brygg Ullmer and others about the state of remote-X (X may be teaching, conferences, meeting, etc.) and I think it may be the right time to push for telepresence again… Perhaps we should try harder to make remote meetings work.

Getting back to Europe, Remote teaching

Due to the volcanic activity in Iceland (and the resulting cancellation of many flights) I was a few days longer in North America than planned. I stayed in Toronto and looked at different options to get home – in short Europe is far away from the North America :-) much further than we typically experience it when we planes are flying.

Here are some options that I explored:

  • looking for a place on a container ship, takes about 7-12 days (does not really work as the capacity of transatlantic ship with regard to transporting people is extremely low – my estimate is 100 people/week – does this sound right?)
  • booking a transatlantic cruise, takes about 7-15 days (very few spaces available, only every few weeks available)
  • flying via the middle east (e.g. Doha, Dubai, Cairo, Istanbul …) and than taking bus/car/train/ship to get back to Germany – seemed feasible (cheap flights were available) but the land journey takes long (e.g. from Turkey to Germany it about 40h).
  • flying to Moscow and taking the train(pretty straightforward ;-)

In the end I waited, got a stand-by space on a direct flight to Frankfurt on Wednesday, and did the teaching via Skype and Google-Talk and had a nice day in Toronto :-) (Fotos from Facebook and probably taken by Jan Gerbecks and Ali)

I had a discussion with Brygg Ullmer and others about the state of remote-X (X may be teaching, conferences, meeting, etc.) and I think it may be the right time to push for telepresence again… Perhaps we should try harder to make remote meetings work.

>Getting back to Europe, Remote teaching

>Due to the volcanic activity in Iceland (and the resulting cancellation of many flights) I was a few days longer in North America than planned. I stayed in Toronto and looked at different options to get home – in short Europe is far away from the North America :-) much further than we typically experience it when we planes are flying.

Here are some options that I explored:

  • looking for a place on a container ship, takes about 7-12 days (does not really work as the capacity of transatlantic ship with regard to transporting people is extremely low – my estimate is 100 people/week – does this sound right?)
  • booking a transatlantic cruise, takes about 7-15 days (very few spaces available, only every few weeks available)
  • flying via the middle east (e.g. Doha, Dubai, Cairo, Istanbul …) and than taking bus/car/train/ship to get back to Germany – seemed feasible (cheap flights were available) but the land journey takes long (e.g. from Turkey to Germany it about 40h).
  • flying to Moscow and taking the train(pretty straightforward ;-)

In the end I waited, got a stand-by space on a direct flight to Frankfurt on Wednesday, and did the teaching via Skype and Google-Talk and had a nice day in Toronto :-) (Fotos from Facebook and probably taken by Jan Gerbecks and Ali)

I had a discussion with Brygg Ullmer and others about the state of remote-X (X may be teaching, conferences, meeting, etc.) and I think it may be the right time to push for telepresence again… Perhaps we should try harder to make remote meetings work.

Talk at the University of New Hampshire, Durham

Andrew Kun invited me to give a talk at the Univeristy of New Hampshire in Durham on my way back from CHI. The talk was on “Embedding Interaction – Human Computer Interaction in the Real World”. In the afternoon I got to see interesting projects in the automotive domain as well as an application on a multi-touch table. At CHI we ran a SIG on Automotive User Interfaces [1].

Seeing the implementation of Project54 live was very exciting. I came across the project first at Pervasive 2005 in Munich [2]. This project is an interesting example of how fast research can become deployed on a large scale.

Andrew chairs together with Susanne Boll the 2nd Int. Conf. on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications – check out the call for papers on http://auto-ui.org/! (deadline 2nd of July 2010)

PS: if you ever stay in Durham – here is my favorite hotel: Three Chimneys Inn Durham.

[1] Schmidt, A., Dey, A. K., Kun, A. L., and Spiessl, W. 2010. Automotive user interfaces: human computer interaction in the car. In Proceedings of the 28th of the international Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Atlanta, Georgia, USA, April 10 – 15, 2010). CHI EA ’10. ACM, New York, NY, 3177-3180. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1753846.1753949

[2] Laslo Turner and Andrew L. Kun, “Evaluating the Project54 speech user interface,” Third International Conference on Pervasive Computing (Adjunct Proceedings), Munich, Germany, May 8-13, 2005

Talk at the University of New Hampshire, Durham

Andrew Kun invited me to give a talk at the Univeristy of New Hampshire in Durham on my way back from CHI. The talk was on “Embedding Interaction – Human Computer Interaction in the Real World”. In the afternoon I got to see interesting projects in the automotive domain as well as an application on a multi-touch table. At CHI we ran a SIG on Automotive User Interfaces [1].

Seeing the implementation of Project54 live was very exciting. I came across the project first at Pervasive 2005 in Munich [2]. This project is an interesting example of how fast research can become deployed on a large scale.

Andrew chairs together with Susanne Boll the 2nd Int. Conf. on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications – check out the call for papers on http://auto-ui.org/! (deadline 2nd of July 2010)

PS: if you ever stay in Durham – here is my favorite hotel: Three Chimneys Inn Durham.

[1] Schmidt, A., Dey, A. K., Kun, A. L., and Spiessl, W. 2010. Automotive user interfaces: human computer interaction in the car. In Proceedings of the 28th of the international Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Atlanta, Georgia, USA, April 10 – 15, 2010). CHI EA ’10. ACM, New York, NY, 3177-3180. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1753846.1753949

[2] Laslo Turner and Andrew L. Kun, “Evaluating the Project54 speech user interface,” Third International Conference on Pervasive Computing (Adjunct Proceedings), Munich, Germany, May 8-13, 2005

>Talk at the University of New Hampshire, Durham

>Andrew Kun invited me to give a talk at the Univeristy of New Hampshire in Durham on my way back from CHI. The talk was on “Embedding Interaction – Human Computer Interaction in the Real World”. In the afternoon I got to see interesting projects in the automotive domain as well as an application on a multi-touch table. At CHI we ran a SIG on Automotive User Interfaces [1].

Seeing the implementation of Project54 live was very exciting. I came across the project first at Pervasive 2005 in Munich [2]. This project is an interesting example of how fast research can become deployed on a large scale.

Andrew chairs together with Susanne Boll the 2nd Int. Conf. on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications – check out the call for papers on http://auto-ui.org/! (deadline 2nd of July 2010)

PS: if you ever stay in Durham – here is my favorite hotel: Three Chimneys Inn Durham.

[1] Schmidt, A., Dey, A. K., Kun, A. L., and Spiessl, W. 2010. Automotive user interfaces: human computer interaction in the car. In Proceedings of the 28th of the international Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Atlanta, Georgia, USA, April 10 – 15, 2010). CHI EA ’10. ACM, New York, NY, 3177-3180. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1753846.1753949

[2] Laslo Turner and Andrew L. Kun, “Evaluating the Project54 speech user interface,” Third International Conference on Pervasive Computing (Adjunct Proceedings), Munich, Germany, May 8-13, 2005

Our Paper and Note at CHI 2010

Over the last year we looked more closely into the potential of eye-gaze for implicit interaction. Gazemarks is an approach where the users’ gaze is continuously monitored and when leaving a screen or display the last active gaze area is determined and store [1]. When the user looks back at this display this region is highlighted. By this the time for attention switching between displays was in our study reduced from about 2000ms to about 700ms. See the slides or paper for details. This could make the difference that we enable people to safely read in the car… but before this more studies are needed :-)

Together with Nokia Research Center in Finland we looked at how we can convey the basic message of an incoming SMS already with the notification tone [2]. Try the Emodetector application for yourself or see the previous post.

[1] Kern, D., Marshall, P., and Schmidt, A. 2010. Gazemarks: gaze-based visual placeholders to ease attention switching. In Proceedings of the 28th international Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Atlanta, Georgia, USA, April 10 – 15, 2010). CHI ’10. ACM, New York, NY, 2093-2102. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1753326.1753646

[2] Sahami Shirazi, A., Sarjanoja, A., Alt, F., Schmidt, A., and Hkkilä, J. 2010. Understanding the impact of abstracted audio preview of SMS. In Proceedings of the 28th international Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (Atlanta, Georgia, USA, April 10 – 15, 2010). CHI ’10. ACM, New York, NY, 1735-1738. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1753326.1753585

PS: the social event was at the aquarium in Atlanta – amazing creatures! Again supprised how well the N95 camera works even under difficult light conditions…