Will social science change completely?

Seeing the recent post on blog.okcupid.com (Gay Sex vs. Straight Sex) made me think if we are approaching a point where our understanding of society will massively change (hopefully for the good) and where we will get much greater insights in who we are. Is this similar to the era of the invention of the microscope? Things become visible and one does not need to guess anymore?

The amount of data collected on websites is huge – and in many cases the data is probably of very high quality as it matter to people who contributed it (probably higher than what you get with a random questionnaire) . I think this is exciting and looking at some of our project proposals going beyond explicit data collection to implicit data collection may even make this approach stronger (adding another x10 on the new microscopes).

>Will social science change completely?

>Seeing the recent post on blog.okcupid.com (Gay Sex vs. Straight Sex) made me think if we are approaching a point where our understanding of society will massively change (hopefully for the good) and where we will get much greater insights in who we are. Is this similar to the era of the invention of the microscope? Things become visible and one does not need to guess anymore?

The amount of data collected on websites is huge – and in many cases the data is probably of very high quality as it matter to people who contributed it (probably higher than what you get with a random questionnaire) . I think this is exciting and looking at some of our project proposals going beyond explicit data collection to implicit data collection may even make this approach stronger (adding another x10 on the new microscopes).

Competitions in computer science for schools

Spending 3 intensive days at the University of Freiburg as member of the jury at the finals of the German computer science competition (Bundeswettbewerb Informatik) I learned once more how vast our field is … especially at the theoretical end. The tasks on the first day were related to stream processing algorithms and on the second day to games on graphs. But don’t be fooled theoreticians have a very different understanding what a good game is ;-)

The 28 people (pupils and high school students – who have not yet started studying) at the finals are the “best” from over 1000 participants and had successfully passed two rounds before. There level of CS knowledge was massively impressive. Many of them would have passed the BSc exams – in Math and theoretical computer science – without much further preparation! The event showed that computer science has a great potential to attract young people.

Here are links to German competions:

  • Informatik Biber (the general CS completion for students from class 5-13, last year some 80.000 pupils took part)
  • Bundeswettbewerb Informatik (the more difficult completion, last year bit more that 1000 pupils took part)

Around the event there were some interesting demos (to impress the prospective students), including Toyota Robina and an autonomous mini-airship.

Competitions in computer science for schools

Spending 3 intensive days at the University of Freiburg as member of the jury at the finals of the German computer science competition (Bundeswettbewerb Informatik) I learned once more how vast our field is … especially at the theoretical end. The tasks on the first day were related to stream processing algorithms and on the second day to games on graphs. But don’t be fooled theoreticians have a very different understanding what a good game is ;-)

The 28 people (pupils and high school students – who have not yet started studying) at the finals are the “best” from over 1000 participants and had successfully passed two rounds before. There level of CS knowledge was massively impressive. Many of them would have passed the BSc exams – in Math and theoretical computer science – without much further preparation! The event showed that computer science has a great potential to attract young people.

Here are links to German competions:

  • Informatik Biber (the general CS completion for students from class 5-13, last year some 80.000 pupils took part)
  • Bundeswettbewerb Informatik (the more difficult completion, last year bit more that 1000 pupils took part)

Around the event there were some interesting demos (to impress the prospective students), including Toyota Robina and an autonomous mini-airship.

>Competitions in computer science for schools

>Spending 3 intensive days at the University of Freiburg as member of the jury at the finals of the German computer science competition (Bundeswettbewerb Informatik) I learned once more how vast our field is … especially at the theoretical end. The tasks on the first day were related to stream processing algorithms and on the second day to games on graphs. But don’t be fooled theoreticians have a very different understanding what a good game is ;-)

The 28 people (pupils and high school students – who have not yet started studying) at the finals are the “best” from over 1000 participants and had successfully passed two rounds before. There level of CS knowledge was massively impressive. Many of them would have passed the BSc exams – in Math and theoretical computer science – without much further preparation! The event showed that computer science has a great potential to attract young people.

Here are links to German competions:

  • Informatik Biber (the general CS completion for students from class 5-13, last year some 80.000 pupils took part)
  • Bundeswettbewerb Informatik (the more difficult completion, last year bit more that 1000 pupils took part)

Around the event there were some interesting demos (to impress the prospective students), including Toyota Robina and an autonomous mini-airship.

Two automotive deadlines today!

Today (Friday, October 1st 2010) there are two deadlines related to automotive computing research:

For the AutomotiveUI 2010 the program looks really exciting, see the conference web page. John Krumm is giving the keynote and the program includes 26 papers (if I counted right) in the areas of: Attention and Distraction, Speech and Sound, Exploring Modes of Interaction, Supporting the Driver, and Connected Cars.

With regard to the special issue I heard that there is a chance to get a few days extension ;-)

Two automotive deadlines today!

Today (Friday, October 1st 2010) there are two deadlines related to automotive computing research:

For the AutomotiveUI 2010 the program looks really exciting, see the conference web page. John Krumm is giving the keynote and the program includes 26 papers (if I counted right) in the areas of: Attention and Distraction, Speech and Sound, Exploring Modes of Interaction, Supporting the Driver, and Connected Cars.

With regard to the special issue I heard that there is a chance to get a few days extension ;-)

>Two automotive deadlines today!

>Today (Friday, October 1st 2010) there are two deadlines related to automotive computing research:

For the AutomotiveUI 2010 the program looks really exciting, see the conference web page. John Krumm is giving the keynote and the program includes 26 papers (if I counted right) in the areas of: Attention and Distraction, Speech and Sound, Exploring Modes of Interaction, Supporting the Driver, and Connected Cars.

With regard to the special issue I heard that there is a chance to get a few days extension ;-)

Ubicomp 2010

Today the 12th international conference on Ubiquitous Computing (ubicomp2010) started in Copenhagen. The conference is very competitive showing a wide range of work in the space of computing beyond the desktop. This year 39 of 202 papers and notes were accepted in the main program. In this part of the program there is a focus of work from North America (which seems to go together with conferences becoming ACM conferences).

The opening keynote was by Morton Kyng on “Making dreams come true – or how to avoid a living nightmare”. In his talk he outlined his view on palpable computing which basically described user centered development of pervasive systems.

This years Ubicomp has a large number of demos and it was fun to engage with these and with the people presenting them. Christian Winkler from our group had an invited demo on “Sense-sation: An Extensible Platform for Integration of Phones into the Web” showing a combined web and mobile phone platform that eases the development of applications that run across several phones. For example is it very easy to create an application where you have a map interface and you can mark an area on the map and request that each of the devices currently in this area is going to take a photo and sent it back (given that the devices run the platform and that you have the right to use the camera on these phones). There will be a full paper on this in a few weeks published at the Internet of Things Conference in Japan and you can already check out the web page: http://www.test.sense-sation.de/

As Ubicomp is not held at a hotel (which I like) there is also no conference hotel with a default bar. Hence the organziers name a Ubicomp 2010 bar: Nyhavn 17. I think this is a good idea!

Ubicomp 2010

Today the 12th international conference on Ubiquitous Computing (ubicomp2010) started in Copenhagen. The conference is very competitive showing a wide range of work in the space of computing beyond the desktop. This year 39 of 202 papers and notes were accepted in the main program. In this part of the program there is a focus of work from North America (which seems to go together with conferences becoming ACM conferences).

The opening keynote was by Morton Kyng on “Making dreams come true – or how to avoid a living nightmare”. In his talk he outlined his view on palpable computing which basically described user centered development of pervasive systems.

This years Ubicomp has a large number of demos and it was fun to engage with these and with the people presenting them. Christian Winkler from our group had an invited demo on “Sense-sation: An Extensible Platform for Integration of Phones into the Web” showing a combined web and mobile phone platform that eases the development of applications that run across several phones. For example is it very easy to create an application where you have a map interface and you can mark an area on the map and request that each of the devices currently in this area is going to take a photo and sent it back (given that the devices run the platform and that you have the right to use the camera on these phones). There will be a full paper on this in a few weeks published at the Internet of Things Conference in Japan and you can already check out the web page: http://www.test.sense-sation.de/

As Ubicomp is not held at a hotel (which I like) there is also no conference hotel with a default bar. Hence the organziers name a Ubicomp 2010 bar: Nyhavn 17. I think this is a good idea!