>Floor for activity recognition

>Patrick Baudisch showed in Paris at the Microsoft Software summit interesting photos of their DIY activity in creating a glass floor for tracking and activity recognition. With a fairly large glass pane in the floor they have created an interesting environment… I am sure there will be interesting things coming out of this installation.

Some years back in 2002 (and looking at the photos and the amount of hair I still had this seems long ago) in Lancaster we also looked in what to do with floors (and we were into DIY as well). We also considered arrangements with a floor tables and furniture on top. As you can see from Kristof, Hans and me on the photo it was a fun project.

The positive point in using load sensing is that you can track unobtrusive and potentially large scales with little instrumentation. We even considered the possibility to put a house on 4 load cells and do activity recognition based on this. We never got around to building the house ;-) The problem with load sensing is that you can only track one moving object/subject at the time.

Looking at the signature of the load measured and doing some signal processing we could detect events – unobtrusive and cheap – but only for single events.

Interested in more details? Have a look at the publications on load sensing [1], on the interaction [2], and at a patent [3] describing the basic technology.

[1] Schmidt, A., Strohbach, M., Laerhoven, K. v., Friday, A., and Gellersen, H. 2002. Context Acquisition Based on Load Sensing. In Proceedings of the 4th international Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (Göteborg, Sweden, September 29 – October 01, 2002). Springer-LNCS, London, 333-350.

[2] Schmidt, A.; Strohbach, M.; van Laerhoven, K. & Hans-W., G. 2003. Ubiquitous Interaction –  Using Surfaces in Everyday Environments as Pointing Devices, Universal Access Theoretical Perspectives, Practice, and Experience (UI4ALL 2003), Springer LNCS, 263-279.

[3] Schmidt, A., Strohbach, M., Van Laerhoven, K., Friday, A., Gellersen, H-W., Kubach, U.; Context acquisition based on load sensing. US Patent 7434459. US Patent Issued on October 14, SAP AG (DE), 2008

Floor for activity recognition

Patrick Baudisch showed in Paris at the Microsoft Software summit interesting photos of their DIY activity in creating a glass floor for tracking and activity recognition. With a fairly large glass pane in the floor they have created an interesting environment… I am sure there will be interesting things coming out of this installation.

Some years back in 2002 (and looking at the photos and the amount of hair I still had this seems long ago) in Lancaster we also looked in what to do with floors (and we were into DIY as well). We also considered arrangements with a floor tables and furniture on top. As you can see from Kristof, Hans and me on the photo it was a fun project.

The positive point in using load sensing is that you can track unobtrusive and potentially large scales with little instrumentation. We even considered the possibility to put a house on 4 load cells and do activity recognition based on this. We never got around to building the house ;-) The problem with load sensing is that you can only track one moving object/subject at the time.

Looking at the signature of the load measured and doing some signal processing we could detect events – unobtrusive and cheap – but only for single events.

Interested in more details? Have a look at the publications on load sensing [1], on the interaction [2], and at a patent [3] describing the basic technology.

[1] Schmidt, A., Strohbach, M., Laerhoven, K. v., Friday, A., and Gellersen, H. 2002. Context Acquisition Based on Load Sensing. In Proceedings of the 4th international Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (Göteborg, Sweden, September 29 – October 01, 2002). Springer-LNCS, London, 333-350.

[2] Schmidt, A.; Strohbach, M.; van Laerhoven, K. & Hans-W., G. 2003. Ubiquitous Interaction –  Using Surfaces in Everyday Environments as Pointing Devices, Universal Access Theoretical Perspectives, Practice, and Experience (UI4ALL 2003), Springer LNCS, 263-279.

[3] Schmidt, A., Strohbach, M., Van Laerhoven, K., Friday, A., Gellersen, H-W., Kubach, U.; Context acquisition based on load sensing. US Patent 7434459. US Patent Issued on October 14, SAP AG (DE), 2008

Floor for activity recognition

Patrick Baudisch showed in Paris at the Microsoft Software summit interesting photos of their DIY activity in creating a glass floor for tracking and activity recognition. With a fairly large glass pane in the floor they have created an interesting environment… I am sure there will be interesting things coming out of this installation.

Some years back in 2002 (and looking at the photos and the amount of hair I still had this seems long ago) in Lancaster we also looked in what to do with floors (and we were into DIY as well). We also considered arrangements with a floor tables and furniture on top. As you can see from Kristof, Hans and me on the photo it was a fun project.

The positive point in using load sensing is that you can track unobtrusive and potentially large scales with little instrumentation. We even considered the possibility to put a house on 4 load cells and do activity recognition based on this. We never got around to building the house ;-) The problem with load sensing is that you can only track one moving object/subject at the time.

Looking at the signature of the load measured and doing some signal processing we could detect events – unobtrusive and cheap – but only for single events.

Interested in more details? Have a look at the publications on load sensing [1], on the interaction [2], and at a patent [3] describing the basic technology.

[1] Schmidt, A., Strohbach, M., Laerhoven, K. v., Friday, A., and Gellersen, H. 2002. Context Acquisition Based on Load Sensing. In Proceedings of the 4th international Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (Göteborg, Sweden, September 29 – October 01, 2002). Springer-LNCS, London, 333-350.

[2] Schmidt, A.; Strohbach, M.; van Laerhoven, K. & Hans-W., G. 2003. Ubiquitous Interaction –  Using Surfaces in Everyday Environments as Pointing Devices, Universal Access Theoretical Perspectives, Practice, and Experience (UI4ALL 2003), Springer LNCS, 263-279.

[3] Schmidt, A., Strohbach, M., Van Laerhoven, K., Friday, A., Gellersen, H-W., Kubach, U.; Context acquisition based on load sensing. US Patent 7434459. US Patent Issued on October 14, SAP AG (DE), 2008

Workshop: Context-aware QoS

The deadline for the workshop on “International Workshop on Context-aware QoS Provisioning and Management for Emerging Networks, Applications and Services” is extended to March 18. Please have a look at the call for papers: http://www.contextqos.org

The workshop is co-located with 20th International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN) 2011 from July 31 – August 4, 2011 at the Sheraton Hotel and Resort, Maui, Hawaii.

Workshop: Context-aware QoS

The deadline for the workshop on “International Workshop on Context-aware QoS Provisioning and Management for Emerging Networks, Applications and Services” is extended to March 18. Please have a look at the call for papers: http://www.contextqos.org

The workshop is co-located with 20th International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN) 2011 from July 31 – August 4, 2011 at the Sheraton Hotel and Resort, Maui, Hawaii.

>Workshop: Context-aware QoS

>The deadline for the workshop on “International Workshop on Context-aware QoS Provisioning and Management for Emerging Networks, Applications and Services” is extended to March 18. Please have a look at the call for papers: http://www.contextqos.org

The workshop is co-located with 20th International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN) 2011 from July 31 – August 4, 2011 at the Sheraton Hotel and Resort, Maui, Hawaii.

Interviewing with Rikke Friis Dam and Mads Søgaard

Rikke Friis Dam and Mads Søgaard are currently working on a re-launch of the website interaction-design.org. The side has over the last years involved in a useful resource for researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction and interaction design. There is a very comprehensive calendar that includes most relevant events in HCI.


With their current work Rikke and Mads pursue a mission to create a new and free resource for teaching and learning interaction design and HCI. In a first step they work with researchers (like myself) around the world that are experts on a certain topic (in my case context-awareness and implicit interaction) to create new teaching materials. This includes a chapter (about 3000 words) that has tutorial character and interviews in which specific topics are discussed in more details.

It was great fun to work with them and I look forward to seeing the new material online.

>Interviewing with Rikke Friis Dam and Mads Søgaard

>Rikke Friis Dam and Mads Søgaard are currently working on a re-launch of the website interaction-design.org. The side has over the last years involved in a useful resource for researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction and interaction design. There is a very comprehensive calendar that includes most relevant events in HCI.


With their current work Rikke and Mads pursue a mission to create a new and free resource for teaching and learning interaction design and HCI. In a first step they work with researchers (like myself) around the world that are experts on a certain topic (in my case context-awareness and implicit interaction) to create new teaching materials. This includes a chapter (about 3000 words) that has tutorial character and interviews in which specific topics are discussed in more details.

It was great fun to work with them and I look forward to seeing the new material online.

Interviewing with Rikke Friis Dam and Mads Søgaard

Rikke Friis Dam and Mads Søgaard are currently working on a re-launch of the website interaction-design.org. The side has over the last years involved in a useful resource for researchers and practitioners in human computer interaction and interaction design. There is a very comprehensive calendar that includes most relevant events in HCI.


With their current work Rikke and Mads pursue a mission to create a new and free resource for teaching and learning interaction design and HCI. In a first step they work with researchers (like myself) around the world that are experts on a certain topic (in my case context-awareness and implicit interaction) to create new teaching materials. This includes a chapter (about 3000 words) that has tutorial character and interviews in which specific topics are discussed in more details.

It was great fun to work with them and I look forward to seeing the new material online.

Keynote by Pertti Huuskonen: Ten Views to Context Awareness

Pertti Huuskonen from Nokia presented his keynote at Percom in Mannheim. I worked with Pertti in 1999 on a European Project TEA – creating context-aware phones [1].

After telling us about CERN and some achievements in physics he raised the issue that an essential skill of humans is that they are context-aware. Basically culture is context-awareness – learning how to appropriately behave in life is essential to be accepted. We do this by looking at other people and by learning how how they act and how others react. “Knowing how to behave” we become fit for social life and this questions the notion of intuitive use as it seems that most of it is learned or copied from others.

He gave a nice overview of how we can context-awareness is useful. One very simple example he showed is that people typically create context at the start of a phone call.

One example of a future to come may be ubiquitous spam – where context may be the enabler but also the enabler for blogging adverts. He also showed the potential of context in the large, see Nokoscope. His keynote was refreshing – and as clearly visible he has a good sense of humor ;-)

[1] Schmidt, A., Aidoo, K. A., Takaluoma, A., Tuomela, U., Laerhoven, K. V., and Velde, W. V. 1999. Advanced Interaction in Context. In Proceedings of the 1st international Symposium on Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing (Karlsruhe, Germany, September 27 – 29, 1999). H. Gellersen, Ed. Lecture Notes In Computer Science, vol. 1707. Springer-Verlag, London, 89-101.