Our Article one Phones as Components of Future Appliances is published in IEEE Pervasive Magazine

In this paper we reflect the opportunities that arise from using consumer devices, such as phones and mp3 players, as components for future devices. With this article also a new department on Innovations in Ubicomp Products has been started. The article “Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances” [1] is also available openly in at ComputingNow.

The rational is

  • developing a custom embedded computer is expensive
  • specific devices are not economic for small quantities
  • phones are becoming cheap (in small quantities a phone may be cheaper than buying a touch screen component for an embedded device)
  • development on phones has become easy and many developers are around
  • IO capabilities can be added to these devices (e.g. Project HiJack)

The main question is: why not use the consumer device as a part (potentially partly hidden) as computing platforms in new devices? There are examples but also some difficulties… read the article to get a more in-depth discussion.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt and Dominik Bial. 2011. Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances. IEEE Pervasive Computing 10, 2 (April 2011), 8-11. DOI=10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 (also available in ComputingNow, download PDF)

Our Article one Phones as Components of Future Appliances is published in IEEE Pervasive Magazine

In this paper we reflect the opportunities that arise from using consumer devices, such as phones and mp3 players, as components for future devices. With this article also a new department on Innovations in Ubicomp Products has been started. The article “Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances” [1] is also available openly in at ComputingNow.

The rational is

  • developing a custom embedded computer is expensive
  • specific devices are not economic for small quantities
  • phones are becoming cheap (in small quantities a phone may be cheaper than buying a touch screen component for an embedded device)
  • development on phones has become easy and many developers are around
  • IO capabilities can be added to these devices (e.g. Project HiJack)

The main question is: why not use the consumer device as a part (potentially partly hidden) as computing platforms in new devices? There are examples but also some difficulties… read the article to get a more in-depth discussion.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt and Dominik Bial. 2011. Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances. IEEE Pervasive Computing 10, 2 (April 2011), 8-11. DOI=10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 (also available in ComputingNow, download PDF)

>Our Article one Phones as Components of Future Appliances is published in IEEE Pervasive Magazine

>

In this paper we reflect the opportunities that arise from using consumer devices, such as phones and mp3 players, as components for future devices. With this article also a new department on Innovations in Ubicomp Products has been started. The article “Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances” [1] is also available openly in at ComputingNow.

The rational is

  • developing a custom embedded computer is expensive
  • specific devices are not economic for small quantities
  • phones are becoming cheap (in small quantities a phone may be cheaper than buying a touch screen component for an embedded device)
  • development on phones has become easy and many developers are around
  • IO capabilities can be added to these devices (e.g. Project HiJack)

The main question is: why not use the consumer device as a part (potentially partly hidden) as computing platforms in new devices? There are examples but also some difficulties… read the article to get a more in-depth discussion.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt and Dominik Bial. 2011. Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances. IEEE Pervasive Computing 10, 2 (April 2011), 8-11. DOI=10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 (also available in ComputingNow, download PDF)

Call for Papers: IEEE Pervasive Computing special Issue on Automotive Pervasive Computing

Next year will be a special issue of the IEEE Pervasive Computing magazine on Automotive Pervasive Computing. I am honored to edit this issue together with Joe Paradiso and Brian Noble :-) The submission deadline for full papers is October 1st and work in progress one month later – see the call for papers for details.

Cars have become an interesting and challenging microcosm for pervasive computing research and we invite articles relating to pervasive computing in the automotive context. Examples of relevant topics are:

Sensing and context in automotive environments

  • Pervasive sensor systems in the car
  • Use of sensors and context for automotive applications
  • Contextual vehicular applications
  • Collaborative sensing with multiple cars

Automotive user interfaces

  • Concepts for in-car user interfaces based on pervasive computing techology
  • Multi-modal interaction in the car
  • Detecting user intentions, emotions, and distraction
  • User interfaces for assistive functionality and autonomous driving
  • Applications of car to car communication

Pervasive computing applications in the car

  • Contextual information and navigation systems
  • Technologies to improve media consumption while driving
  • Communication appliances for drivers and passengers
  • In-car pervasive gaming for passengers and drivers

Experience with pervasive computing in the car

  • Experiences with pervasive computing technologies in cars
  • Case studies of automotive pervasive computing
  • Ethnographic work on the use of technologies in cars

For details see the cfp at: http://computer.org/pervasive/cfp3

Call for Papers: IEEE Pervasive Computing special Issue on Automotive Pervasive Computing

Next year will be a special issue of the IEEE Pervasive Computing magazine on Automotive Pervasive Computing. I am honored to edit this issue together with Joe Paradiso and Brian Noble :-) The submission deadline for full papers is October 1st and work in progress one month later – see the call for papers for details.

Cars have become an interesting and challenging microcosm for pervasive computing research and we invite articles relating to pervasive computing in the automotive context. Examples of relevant topics are:

Sensing and context in automotive environments

  • Pervasive sensor systems in the car
  • Use of sensors and context for automotive applications
  • Contextual vehicular applications
  • Collaborative sensing with multiple cars

Automotive user interfaces

  • Concepts for in-car user interfaces based on pervasive computing techology
  • Multi-modal interaction in the car
  • Detecting user intentions, emotions, and distraction
  • User interfaces for assistive functionality and autonomous driving
  • Applications of car to car communication

Pervasive computing applications in the car

  • Contextual information and navigation systems
  • Technologies to improve media consumption while driving
  • Communication appliances for drivers and passengers
  • In-car pervasive gaming for passengers and drivers

Experience with pervasive computing in the car

  • Experiences with pervasive computing technologies in cars
  • Case studies of automotive pervasive computing
  • Ethnographic work on the use of technologies in cars

For details see the cfp at: http://computer.org/pervasive/cfp3

>Call for Papers: IEEE Pervasive Computing special Issue on Automotive Pervasive Computing

>Next year will be a special issue of the IEEE Pervasive Computing magazine on Automotive Pervasive Computing. I am honored to edit this issue together with Joe Paradiso and Brian Noble :-) The submission deadline for full papers is October 1st and work in progress one month later – see the call for papers for details.

Cars have become an interesting and challenging microcosm for pervasive computing research and we invite articles relating to pervasive computing in the automotive context. Examples of relevant topics are:

Sensing and context in automotive environments

  • Pervasive sensor systems in the car
  • Use of sensors and context for automotive applications
  • Contextual vehicular applications
  • Collaborative sensing with multiple cars

Automotive user interfaces

  • Concepts for in-car user interfaces based on pervasive computing techology
  • Multi-modal interaction in the car
  • Detecting user intentions, emotions, and distraction
  • User interfaces for assistive functionality and autonomous driving
  • Applications of car to car communication

Pervasive computing applications in the car

  • Contextual information and navigation systems
  • Technologies to improve media consumption while driving
  • Communication appliances for drivers and passengers
  • In-car pervasive gaming for passengers and drivers

Experience with pervasive computing in the car

  • Experiences with pervasive computing technologies in cars
  • Case studies of automotive pervasive computing
  • Ethnographic work on the use of technologies in cars

For details see the cfp at: http://computer.org/pervasive/cfp3

IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine facebook page

At the editorial board meeting we discussed new ideas on how to distribute content of the IEEE Pervasive Magazine in further ways. The magazine is widely read, has a healthy acceptance rate (about 20%) and articles are highly cited – but I think we cannot ignore that access to media is rapidly changing.

Currently this effort is not about replacing the print copy and the PDF in the online library but to add further channels. One Idea is to have a podcast that provides some of the articles (e.g. conference report or other departments) or to have an audio preview of a new issue (e.g. Guest editors introduction and abstracts of technical articles).

The experiment has started :-)

Grace Tai read one article (conference report on the Auto-UI conference, [1]) and this is now available as MP3. This MP3 is deliberately “home made” as we would expect that this is a quality we as a community (e.g. the authors reading their articles, volunteers reading the articles) can achieve.

It would be great if we can start a discussion how useful such a podcast would be. There is a facebook page where the discussion already started: www.facebook.com/pervasive

If you have recently authored an article for the IEEE Pervasive Magazine – it would be great if you could also read it an share it here for discussion on the facebook page.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt, Wolfgang Spiessl, Dagmar Kern, “Driving Automotive User Interface Research,” IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 85-88, Jan.-Mar. 2010, doi:10.1109/MPRV.2010.3.

IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine facebook page

At the editorial board meeting we discussed new ideas on how to distribute content of the IEEE Pervasive Magazine in further ways. The magazine is widely read, has a healthy acceptance rate (about 20%) and articles are highly cited – but I think we cannot ignore that access to media is rapidly changing.

Currently this effort is not about replacing the print copy and the PDF in the online library but to add further channels. One Idea is to have a podcast that provides some of the articles (e.g. conference report or other departments) or to have an audio preview of a new issue (e.g. Guest editors introduction and abstracts of technical articles).

The experiment has started :-)

Grace Tai read one article (conference report on the Auto-UI conference, [1]) and this is now available as MP3. This MP3 is deliberately “home made” as we would expect that this is a quality we as a community (e.g. the authors reading their articles, volunteers reading the articles) can achieve.

It would be great if we can start a discussion how useful such a podcast would be. There is a facebook page where the discussion already started: www.facebook.com/pervasive

If you have recently authored an article for the IEEE Pervasive Magazine – it would be great if you could also read it an share it here for discussion on the facebook page.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt, Wolfgang Spiessl, Dagmar Kern, “Driving Automotive User Interface Research,” IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 85-88, Jan.-Mar. 2010, doi:10.1109/MPRV.2010.3.

>IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine facebook page

>At the editorial board meeting we discussed new ideas on how to distribute content of the IEEE Pervasive Magazine in further ways. The magazine is widely read, has a healthy acceptance rate (about 20%) and articles are highly cited – but I think we cannot ignore that access to media is rapidly changing.

Currently this effort is not about replacing the print copy and the PDF in the online library but to add further channels. One Idea is to have a podcast that provides some of the articles (e.g. conference report or other departments) or to have an audio preview of a new issue (e.g. Guest editors introduction and abstracts of technical articles).

The experiment has started :-)

Grace Tai read one article (conference report on the Auto-UI conference, [1]) and this is now available as MP3. This MP3 is deliberately “home made” as we would expect that this is a quality we as a community (e.g. the authors reading their articles, volunteers reading the articles) can achieve.

It would be great if we can start a discussion how useful such a podcast would be. There is a facebook page where the discussion already started: www.facebook.com/pervasive

If you have recently authored an article for the IEEE Pervasive Magazine – it would be great if you could also read it an share it here for discussion on the facebook page.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt, Wolfgang Spiessl, Dagmar Kern, “Driving Automotive User Interface Research,” IEEE Pervasive Computing, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 85-88, Jan.-Mar. 2010, doi:10.1109/MPRV.2010.3.

Pervasive Editorial Board Meeting in Santa Clara

The IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine is one of 4 magazines I still read in paper (the others are IEEE Computer, Communications of the ACM, and Interactions) and we had interesting discussions how we read/consume magazine content in the future. In the near future it seems likely to me that we will get more choice and will use more different media. For the Pervasive Magazine we will over the next month experiment with some new ideas. There is a new faccbook page: www.facebook.com/pervasive

It was for me the first editorial board meeting of the IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine and I was impressed by the people :-) We discussed the upcoming special issues for the magazine – and I am thrilled that one will be on automotive pervasive computing! The call will be published in the next weeks. The magazine has a set of departments and we discussed how to move these forward. It is exiting that we will have a new department that will provide short tutorials on research methods and I am looking forward to contribute in a department on new pervasive computing devices.

Prior to the meeting there was an interesting workshop at Intel in Santa Clara looking a future challenges and opportunities from ubicomp research.

PS: Satya suggested a book: The Shallows – What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas Carr.