>Lukowicz Consumer Confidence Index

>Paul Lukowicz taked in the symposium on Interaction with Smart Artifacts in Tokyo about “Large scale, context aware socio-technical systems”. As a number of other talks in our symposium he also pointed out that value of the massive amounts of data that become available by mobile sensing and crowd interaction.

Paul gave one example how such sensing data could be used. I think this is really interesting that is why I share here the Paul “Lukowicz Consumer Confidence Index” (CCIL) which is based on detecting the whereabouts of people. It assumes that we can estimate the number of people shopping at various places based on the use of their mobile devices.

Lukowicz Consumer Confidence Index

Paul Lukowicz taked in the symposium on Interaction with Smart Artifacts in Tokyo about “Large scale, context aware socio-technical systems”. As a number of other talks in our symposium he also pointed out that value of the massive amounts of data that become available by mobile sensing and crowd interaction.

Paul gave one example how such sensing data could be used. I think this is really interesting that is why I share here the Paul “Lukowicz Consumer Confidence Index” (CCIL) which is based on detecting the whereabouts of people. It assumes that we can estimate the number of people shopping at various places based on the use of their mobile devices.

Lukowicz Consumer Confidence Index

Paul Lukowicz taked in the symposium on Interaction with Smart Artifacts in Tokyo about “Large scale, context aware socio-technical systems”. As a number of other talks in our symposium he also pointed out that value of the massive amounts of data that become available by mobile sensing and crowd interaction.

Paul gave one example how such sensing data could be used. I think this is really interesting that is why I share here the Paul “Lukowicz Consumer Confidence Index” (CCIL) which is based on detecting the whereabouts of people. It assumes that we can estimate the number of people shopping at various places based on the use of their mobile devices.

>Sharing your Alarm Clock Settings and Interaction

>We recently discussed more ideas on sharing alarm clock settings and sharing of the interaction with the alarm clock. Conceptually we have created a design some years back: the networked alarm clock that we published at the 3AD conference [1]. 2008 there was a interesting paper at CSCW that look in more detail what such designs can enable for group communication [2].

As many people (and I heard that the most used function on a phone is the alarm clock) use their phone as their alarm clock it could be the right time to put some of these idea into reality…

[1] Schmidt, A. 2006. Network alarm clock (The 3AD International Design Competition). Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 10, 2-3 (Jan. 2006), 191-192. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-005-0022-y

[2] Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., and Abowd, G. D. 2008. Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (San Diego, CA, USA, November 08 – 12, 2008). CSCW ’08. ACM, New York, NY, 619-628. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1460563.1460660

Sharing your Alarm Clock Settings and Interaction

We recently discussed more ideas on sharing alarm clock settings and sharing of the interaction with the alarm clock. Conceptually we have created a design some years back: the networked alarm clock that we published at the 3AD conference [1]. 2008 there was a interesting paper at CSCW that look in more detail what such designs can enable for group communication [2].

As many people (and I heard that the most used function on a phone is the alarm clock) use their phone as their alarm clock it could be the right time to put some of these idea into reality…

[1] Schmidt, A. 2006. Network alarm clock (The 3AD International Design Competition). Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 10, 2-3 (Jan. 2006), 191-192. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-005-0022-y

[2] Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., and Abowd, G. D. 2008. Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (San Diego, CA, USA, November 08 – 12, 2008). CSCW ’08. ACM, New York, NY, 619-628. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1460563.1460660

Sharing your Alarm Clock Settings and Interaction

We recently discussed more ideas on sharing alarm clock settings and sharing of the interaction with the alarm clock. Conceptually we have created a design some years back: the networked alarm clock that we published at the 3AD conference [1]. 2008 there was a interesting paper at CSCW that look in more detail what such designs can enable for group communication [2].

As many people (and I heard that the most used function on a phone is the alarm clock) use their phone as their alarm clock it could be the right time to put some of these idea into reality…

[1] Schmidt, A. 2006. Network alarm clock (The 3AD International Design Competition). Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 10, 2-3 (Jan. 2006), 191-192. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-005-0022-y

[2] Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., and Abowd, G. D. 2008. Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (San Diego, CA, USA, November 08 – 12, 2008). CSCW ’08. ACM, New York, NY, 619-628. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1460563.1460660

ebook, tangibe programming, iPhones bring back wired telephony

Having used the Sony PRS-505 now for a few weeks (mainly to read dissertations and project reports) I have quickly gotten used to carrying less weight. The user interface requires some learning – as the screen is pretty slow pressing a button does not give immediate feedback and that feels strange – more than expected. I wonder if there are studies on traditional interacton with electronic paper? Another issue: it seems to depend on the crew whether or not it is OK to read from an eBook during the entire flight (including take-off and landing)…

While reading a thesis I was reminded of an interesting paper on tangible programming [1] from a special issue of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing we did in 2004. The paper situates the topic historically and gives an interesting introduction.

In recent meetings as well as in airports around the world one can observe a trend: wired telephony! Whereas people with traditional mobile phone walk up and down and talk on the phone iPhone users often sit wired up to the next power plug an phone… seems apple has re-invented wired telephony ;-) and other brands will soon follow (make sure to reserve a seat with a power connection).

[1] McNerney, T. S. 2004. From turtles to Tangible Programming Bricks: explorations in physical language design. Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 8, 5 (Sep. 2004), 326-337. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-004-0295-6

>ebook, tangibe programming, iPhones bring back wired telephony

>Having used the Sony PRS-505 now for a few weeks (mainly to read dissertations and project reports) I have quickly gotten used to carrying less weight. The user interface requires some learning – as the screen is pretty slow pressing a button does not give immediate feedback and that feels strange – more than expected. I wonder if there are studies on traditional interacton with electronic paper? Another issue: it seems to depend on the crew whether or not it is OK to read from an eBook during the entire flight (including take-off and landing)…

While reading a thesis I was reminded of an interesting paper on tangible programming [1] from a special issue of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing we did in 2004. The paper situates the topic historically and gives an interesting introduction.

In recent meetings as well as in airports around the world one can observe a trend: wired telephony! Whereas people with traditional mobile phone walk up and down and talk on the phone iPhone users often sit wired up to the next power plug an phone… seems apple has re-invented wired telephony ;-) and other brands will soon follow (make sure to reserve a seat with a power connection).

[1] McNerney, T. S. 2004. From turtles to Tangible Programming Bricks: explorations in physical language design. Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 8, 5 (Sep. 2004), 326-337. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-004-0295-6

ebook, tangibe programming, iPhones bring back wired telephony

Having used the Sony PRS-505 now for a few weeks (mainly to read dissertations and project reports) I have quickly gotten used to carrying less weight. The user interface requires some learning – as the screen is pretty slow pressing a button does not give immediate feedback and that feels strange – more than expected. I wonder if there are studies on traditional interacton with electronic paper? Another issue: it seems to depend on the crew whether or not it is OK to read from an eBook during the entire flight (including take-off and landing)…

While reading a thesis I was reminded of an interesting paper on tangible programming [1] from a special issue of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing we did in 2004. The paper situates the topic historically and gives an interesting introduction.

In recent meetings as well as in airports around the world one can observe a trend: wired telephony! Whereas people with traditional mobile phone walk up and down and talk on the phone iPhone users often sit wired up to the next power plug an phone… seems apple has re-invented wired telephony ;-) and other brands will soon follow (make sure to reserve a seat with a power connection).

[1] McNerney, T. S. 2004. From turtles to Tangible Programming Bricks: explorations in physical language design. Personal Ubiquitous Comput. 8, 5 (Sep. 2004), 326-337. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-004-0295-6

Christmas market in Essen

Going to Christmas market is in Germany a tradition – and obviously our group went, too ;-)
It is interesting that most of us had time for this “appointment” with only two days notice – usually it takes us weeks to find a date for a meeting and so far we did not find a date for a strategy meeting in the near future. Perhaps offering Glühwein (that is what you drink at Christmas markets) would help…
The quality of photos taken with a mobile phone is in difficult context (e.g. night, lights around) still not satisfactory (even with 5MP, downscaling, and image enhancing).