Our Article one Phones as Components of Future Appliances is published in IEEE Pervasive Magazine

In this paper we reflect the opportunities that arise from using consumer devices, such as phones and mp3 players, as components for future devices. With this article also a new department on Innovations in Ubicomp Products has been started. The article “Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances” [1] is also available openly in at ComputingNow.

The rational is

  • developing a custom embedded computer is expensive
  • specific devices are not economic for small quantities
  • phones are becoming cheap (in small quantities a phone may be cheaper than buying a touch screen component for an embedded device)
  • development on phones has become easy and many developers are around
  • IO capabilities can be added to these devices (e.g. Project HiJack)

The main question is: why not use the consumer device as a part (potentially partly hidden) as computing platforms in new devices? There are examples but also some difficulties… read the article to get a more in-depth discussion.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt and Dominik Bial. 2011. Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances. IEEE Pervasive Computing 10, 2 (April 2011), 8-11. DOI=10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 (also available in ComputingNow, download PDF)

>Our Article one Phones as Components of Future Appliances is published in IEEE Pervasive Magazine

>

In this paper we reflect the opportunities that arise from using consumer devices, such as phones and mp3 players, as components for future devices. With this article also a new department on Innovations in Ubicomp Products has been started. The article “Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances” [1] is also available openly in at ComputingNow.

The rational is

  • developing a custom embedded computer is expensive
  • specific devices are not economic for small quantities
  • phones are becoming cheap (in small quantities a phone may be cheaper than buying a touch screen component for an embedded device)
  • development on phones has become easy and many developers are around
  • IO capabilities can be added to these devices (e.g. Project HiJack)

The main question is: why not use the consumer device as a part (potentially partly hidden) as computing platforms in new devices? There are examples but also some difficulties… read the article to get a more in-depth discussion.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt and Dominik Bial. 2011. Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances. IEEE Pervasive Computing 10, 2 (April 2011), 8-11. DOI=10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 (also available in ComputingNow, download PDF)

Our Article one Phones as Components of Future Appliances is published in IEEE Pervasive Magazine

In this paper we reflect the opportunities that arise from using consumer devices, such as phones and mp3 players, as components for future devices. With this article also a new department on Innovations in Ubicomp Products has been started. The article “Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances” [1] is also available openly in at ComputingNow.

The rational is

  • developing a custom embedded computer is expensive
  • specific devices are not economic for small quantities
  • phones are becoming cheap (in small quantities a phone may be cheaper than buying a touch screen component for an embedded device)
  • development on phones has become easy and many developers are around
  • IO capabilities can be added to these devices (e.g. Project HiJack)

The main question is: why not use the consumer device as a part (potentially partly hidden) as computing platforms in new devices? There are examples but also some difficulties… read the article to get a more in-depth discussion.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt and Dominik Bial. 2011. Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances. IEEE Pervasive Computing 10, 2 (April 2011), 8-11. DOI=10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MPRV.2011.31 (also available in ComputingNow, download PDF)

>How will computing change the world? Our view in Computing Now.

>Together with Marc Langheinrich and Kristian Kersting we wrote an article on how computing is going to change our world [1] and featured in Computing Now. We discuss how upcoming technologies will change the our perception. Besides others we make the bold statement “By the middle of this century, the boundaries between direct and remote perception will become blurred“.


We discuss how our perception is extended and augmented by technical means and how this will eventually lead to a new augmented sense of ubiquitous perception. We expect this will radically change the way we live and hence ethical considerations are central. We make the argument that ethics become a major design factor. We are looking forward to feedback on this vision – even if you disagree.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt, Marc Langheinrich, Kritian Kersting, “Perception beyond the Here and Now,” Computer, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 86-88, Feb. 2011, doi:10.1109/MC.2011.54 (PDF)

How will computing change the world? Our view in Computing Now.

Together with Marc Langheinrich and Kristian Kersting we wrote an article on how computing is going to change our world [1] and featured in Computing Now. We discuss how upcoming technologies will change the our perception. Besides others we make the bold statement “By the middle of this century, the boundaries between direct and remote perception will become blurred“.


We discuss how our perception is extended and augmented by technical means and how this will eventually lead to a new augmented sense of ubiquitous perception. We expect this will radically change the way we live and hence ethical considerations are central. We make the argument that ethics become a major design factor. We are looking forward to feedback on this vision – even if you disagree.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt, Marc Langheinrich, Kritian Kersting, “Perception beyond the Here and Now,” Computer, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 86-88, Feb. 2011, doi:10.1109/MC.2011.54 (PDF)

How will computing change the world? Our view in Computing Now.

Together with Marc Langheinrich and Kristian Kersting we wrote an article on how computing is going to change our world [1] and featured in Computing Now. We discuss how upcoming technologies will change the our perception. Besides others we make the bold statement “By the middle of this century, the boundaries between direct and remote perception will become blurred“.


We discuss how our perception is extended and augmented by technical means and how this will eventually lead to a new augmented sense of ubiquitous perception. We expect this will radically change the way we live and hence ethical considerations are central. We make the argument that ethics become a major design factor. We are looking forward to feedback on this vision – even if you disagree.

[1] Albrecht Schmidt, Marc Langheinrich, Kritian Kersting, “Perception beyond the Here and Now,” Computer, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 86-88, Feb. 2011, doi:10.1109/MC.2011.54 (PDF)

Random Links for Scientific Search in CS

Scientific search sides:
http://scholar.google.de/
http://www.confsearch.org
http://academic.research.microsoft.com/
http://arnetminer.org/

Digital libraries:
http://acm.org/dl
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org
http://www.springerlink.com/

Listings of publications, co-authors, and relationships:
http://www.informatik.uni-trier.de/~ley/db/index.html
http://dblp.mpi-inf.mpg.de/dblp/index.php

Random Links for Scientific Search in CS

Scientific search sides:
http://scholar.google.de/
http://www.confsearch.org
http://academic.research.microsoft.com/
http://arnetminer.org/

Digital libraries:
http://acm.org/dl
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org
http://www.springerlink.com/

Listings of publications, co-authors, and relationships:
http://www.informatik.uni-trier.de/~ley/db/index.html
http://dblp.mpi-inf.mpg.de/dblp/index.php

>Random Links for Scientific Search in CS

>Scientific search sides:
http://scholar.google.de/
http://www.confsearch.org
http://academic.research.microsoft.com/
http://arnetminer.org/

Digital libraries:
http://acm.org/dl
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org
http://www.springerlink.com/

Listings of publications, co-authors, and relationships:
http://www.informatik.uni-trier.de/~ley/db/index.html
http://dblp.mpi-inf.mpg.de/dblp/index.php

Our Paper on Mobile Product Review Systems at Mobile HCI 2010

Felix von Reischach investigated in his PhD mobile product review systems. The paper [1] he presented at mobile HCI 2010 in Lisbon compares different modalities for product reviews and recommendations. In particular we looked at the following modalities: discrete scale (stars), text, and video. In a study at the SAP retail lab we compared how easy it was for participants to create reviews in each of the modalities and how much they like creating these. Additionally we also compared which modalities are most liked by people in a buying situation and which type of review the trust. Interestingly a star rating scheme is most liked – for input and output.
Our general recommendation is to allow users to rate products on a scale (e.g. using stars) in different, potentially user defined categories. For a more detailed discussion see the paper [1].

The evening event of was at Palácio da Pena, Sintra – a castle close to Lisbon. The view and the food were magnificent – it felt like a real treat after the one hour walk up the steep hill.

[1] von Reischach, F., Dubach, E., Michahelles, F., and Schmidt, A. 2010. An evaluation of product review modalities for mobile phones. In Proceedings of the 12th international Conference on Human Computer interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Lisbon, Portugal, September 07 – 10, 2010). MobileHCI ’10. ACM, New York, NY, 199-208. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1851600.1851635

Abstract:
Research has shown that product reviews on the Internet not only support consumers when shopping, but also lead to increased sales for retailers. Recent approaches successfully use smart phones to directly relate products (e.g. via barcode or RFID) to corresponding reviews, making these available to consumers on the go. However, it is unknown what modality (star ratings/text/video) users consider useful for creating reviews and using reviews on their mobile phone, and how the preferred modalities are different from those on the Web. To shed light on this we conduct two experiments, one of them in a quasi-realistic shopping environment. The results indicate that, in contrast to the known approaches, stars and pre-structured text blocks should be implemented on mobile phones rather than long texts and videos. Users prefer less and rather well-aggregated product information while on the go. This accounts both for entering and, surprisingly, also for using product reviews.