>TEI growing up, Dinner with Hiroshi Ishii and Don Norman

>This is now the 5th TEI conference and it has about 300 people attending. It is still a very young community, with many students attending, but also the “big names” are at the conference. When Brygg and I started with a small conference in 2007 (in Baton Rouge) and 2008 (in Bonn) we considered there is a need for tangible and embedded interaction work to find a venue but we did not expect that the community was growing so rapidly. Looking at the presentations and contributions show at this year’s conference it is clear that the conference is growing up – without losing its exciting mix of contributions.

It is great to talk to Don Norman and Hiroshi Ishii over dinner and seeing them engaging with this young community. They both have made major contributions to this community and have inspired my personal research some 10 years back. If you have not done so I recommend to read some of their early contributions, such as Hiroshi’s CHI1997 paper [1,2] and Don’s invisible computing book [3,4]. Both have published and publish many interesting articles and books which are central to the HCI literature, check out their web pages: Hiroshi Ishii and Don Norman.

[1] Ishii, H. and Ullmer, B., “Tangible Bits: Towards Seamless Interfaces between People, Bits and Atoms,” Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’97), ACM, Atlanta, March 1997, pp. 234-241.

[2] Fitzmaurice, G., Ishii, H., Buxton, W., “Bricks: Laying the Foundations for Graspable User Interfaces,” Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’95), ACM, Denver, May 1995, pp. 442-449.

[3] Donald Norman, The Invisible Computer. 1998, Cambridge MA, MIT Press

[4] Donald Norman, The design of Everyday Objects, 2002 Basic Books (Perseus)

TEI growing up, Dinner with Hiroshi Ishii and Don Norman

This is now the 5th TEI conference and it has about 300 people attending. It is still a very young community, with many students attending, but also the “big names” are at the conference. When Brygg and I started with a small conference in 2007 (in Baton Rouge) and 2008 (in Bonn) we considered there is a need for tangible and embedded interaction work to find a venue but we did not expect that the community was growing so rapidly. Looking at the presentations and contributions show at this year’s conference it is clear that the conference is growing up – without losing its exciting mix of contributions.

It is great to talk to Don Norman and Hiroshi Ishii over dinner and seeing them engaging with this young community. They both have made major contributions to this community and have inspired my personal research some 10 years back. If you have not done so I recommend to read some of their early contributions, such as Hiroshi’s CHI1997 paper [1,2] and Don’s invisible computing book [3,4]. Both have published and publish many interesting articles and books which are central to the HCI literature, check out their web pages: Hiroshi Ishii and Don Norman.

[1] Ishii, H. and Ullmer, B., “Tangible Bits: Towards Seamless Interfaces between People, Bits and Atoms,” Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’97), ACM, Atlanta, March 1997, pp. 234-241.

[2] Fitzmaurice, G., Ishii, H., Buxton, W., “Bricks: Laying the Foundations for Graspable User Interfaces,” Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’95), ACM, Denver, May 1995, pp. 442-449.

[3] Donald Norman, The Invisible Computer. 1998, Cambridge MA, MIT Press

[4] Donald Norman, The design of Everyday Objects, 2002 Basic Books (Perseus)

TEI growing up, Dinner with Hiroshi Ishii and Don Norman

This is now the 5th TEI conference and it has about 300 people attending. It is still a very young community, with many students attending, but also the “big names” are at the conference. When Brygg and I started with a small conference in 2007 (in Baton Rouge) and 2008 (in Bonn) we considered there is a need for tangible and embedded interaction work to find a venue but we did not expect that the community was growing so rapidly. Looking at the presentations and contributions show at this year’s conference it is clear that the conference is growing up – without losing its exciting mix of contributions.

It is great to talk to Don Norman and Hiroshi Ishii over dinner and seeing them engaging with this young community. They both have made major contributions to this community and have inspired my personal research some 10 years back. If you have not done so I recommend to read some of their early contributions, such as Hiroshi’s CHI1997 paper [1,2] and Don’s invisible computing book [3,4]. Both have published and publish many interesting articles and books which are central to the HCI literature, check out their web pages: Hiroshi Ishii and Don Norman.

[1] Ishii, H. and Ullmer, B., “Tangible Bits: Towards Seamless Interfaces between People, Bits and Atoms,” Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’97), ACM, Atlanta, March 1997, pp. 234-241.

[2] Fitzmaurice, G., Ishii, H., Buxton, W., “Bricks: Laying the Foundations for Graspable User Interfaces,” Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’95), ACM, Denver, May 1995, pp. 442-449.

[3] Donald Norman, The Invisible Computer. 1998, Cambridge MA, MIT Press

[4] Donald Norman, The design of Everyday Objects, 2002 Basic Books (Perseus)

Breakfast reading: tabgible UIs, brands, and user centred design

The current issue interactions (http://interactions.acm.org) features some interesting articles – at least scanning through it and reading some of them prolonged my breakfast today considerably ;-)

The cover story gives an already in its title a very interesting definition of tangible interaction (Tangible Interaction = Form + Computing) [1]. Their view is very much from a design perspective, but provides a good introduction to the topic.

The article by Jay Chaeyong Yi on a success story from Korea is a very good case study of how to apply UI research [2]. It shows (1) a comprehensive example of user driven research and (2) the value and importance it contributes to a product/service. Even though the article describes a project from 2005 I find the topic of messaging on phone still exciting and the example of IM vs. SMS can still tell a lot. Personally I am really interested in where messaging on the phone goes – perhaps there is some time next week in Tampere to discuss this.

Not central on user interfaces but still quite interesting is the article on operationalizing brands with Web 2.0 technologies [3]. The example of eBags.com shows interestingly what is currently possible. Thinking and imagine a bit further and considering the opportunities that arise from the web/internet of things (e.g. where you know from the bag how it is used and can communicate this) some real change will be ahead. And some companies are slowly getting to the point of bringing first products that go into this direction (Ali pointed me to http://greengoose.com).

After setting up some IKEA furniture with my daughter (model BENNO as bookshelf for paper backs and not for CD/DVDs) I found Don Norman’s article where he discusses the issue consuming vs. producing or spectator vs. creator quite interesting [4].

[1] Baskinger, M. and Gross, M. 2010. Tangible interaction = form + computing. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 6-11. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649477

[2] Yi, J. C. 2010. User-research-driven mobile user interface innovation: a success story from Seoul. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 48-51. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649487

[3] Yohn, D. L. 2010. Operationalizing brands with new technologies. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 24-27. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649481

[4] Norman, D. A. 2010. The transmedia design challenge: technology that is pleasurable and satisfying. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 12-15. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649478

>Breakfast reading: tabgible UIs, brands, and user centred design

>The current issue interactions (http://interactions.acm.org) features some interesting articles – at least scanning through it and reading some of them prolonged my breakfast today considerably ;-)

The cover story gives an already in its title a very interesting definition of tangible interaction (Tangible Interaction = Form + Computing) [1]. Their view is very much from a design perspective, but provides a good introduction to the topic.

The article by Jay Chaeyong Yi on a success story from Korea is a very good case study of how to apply UI research [2]. It shows (1) a comprehensive example of user driven research and (2) the value and importance it contributes to a product/service. Even though the article describes a project from 2005 I find the topic of messaging on phone still exciting and the example of IM vs. SMS can still tell a lot. Personally I am really interested in where messaging on the phone goes – perhaps there is some time next week in Tampere to discuss this.

Not central on user interfaces but still quite interesting is the article on operationalizing brands with Web 2.0 technologies [3]. The example of eBags.com shows interestingly what is currently possible. Thinking and imagine a bit further and considering the opportunities that arise from the web/internet of things (e.g. where you know from the bag how it is used and can communicate this) some real change will be ahead. And some companies are slowly getting to the point of bringing first products that go into this direction (Ali pointed me to http://greengoose.com).

After setting up some IKEA furniture with my daughter (model BENNO as bookshelf for paper backs and not for CD/DVDs) I found Don Norman’s article where he discusses the issue consuming vs. producing or spectator vs. creator quite interesting [4].

[1] Baskinger, M. and Gross, M. 2010. Tangible interaction = form + computing. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 6-11. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649477

[2] Yi, J. C. 2010. User-research-driven mobile user interface innovation: a success story from Seoul. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 48-51. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649487

[3] Yohn, D. L. 2010. Operationalizing brands with new technologies. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 24-27. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649481

[4] Norman, D. A. 2010. The transmedia design challenge: technology that is pleasurable and satisfying. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 12-15. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649478

Breakfast reading: tabgible UIs, brands, and user centred design

The current issue interactions (http://interactions.acm.org) features some interesting articles – at least scanning through it and reading some of them prolonged my breakfast today considerably ;-)

The cover story gives an already in its title a very interesting definition of tangible interaction (Tangible Interaction = Form + Computing) [1]. Their view is very much from a design perspective, but provides a good introduction to the topic.

The article by Jay Chaeyong Yi on a success story from Korea is a very good case study of how to apply UI research [2]. It shows (1) a comprehensive example of user driven research and (2) the value and importance it contributes to a product/service. Even though the article describes a project from 2005 I find the topic of messaging on phone still exciting and the example of IM vs. SMS can still tell a lot. Personally I am really interested in where messaging on the phone goes – perhaps there is some time next week in Tampere to discuss this.

Not central on user interfaces but still quite interesting is the article on operationalizing brands with Web 2.0 technologies [3]. The example of eBags.com shows interestingly what is currently possible. Thinking and imagine a bit further and considering the opportunities that arise from the web/internet of things (e.g. where you know from the bag how it is used and can communicate this) some real change will be ahead. And some companies are slowly getting to the point of bringing first products that go into this direction (Ali pointed me to http://greengoose.com).

After setting up some IKEA furniture with my daughter (model BENNO as bookshelf for paper backs and not for CD/DVDs) I found Don Norman’s article where he discusses the issue consuming vs. producing or spectator vs. creator quite interesting [4].

[1] Baskinger, M. and Gross, M. 2010. Tangible interaction = form + computing. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 6-11. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649477

[2] Yi, J. C. 2010. User-research-driven mobile user interface innovation: a success story from Seoul. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 48-51. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649487

[3] Yohn, D. L. 2010. Operationalizing brands with new technologies. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 24-27. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649481

[4] Norman, D. A. 2010. The transmedia design challenge: technology that is pleasurable and satisfying. interactions 17, 1 (Jan. 2010), 12-15. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1649475.1649478

Ubiquitous Computing – Ever wondered if we are there yet?

Given the technologies around us I sometimes wonder how close we are to a vision of ubiquitous computing. In this month IEEE Computer Invisible Computing column I had the pleasure to ask this question and share my view on it.

The short answer is: many technologies are ubiquitous but there is a lot more to come. In particular we see that many technologies (public displays, people centric sensing, and personal memory devices) are just around the corner and that they may have a large impact on how we perceive computing. For the long answer have a look at my article: ubiquitous computing – are we there yet? [1]. I have taken over responsibility for the invisible computing column from Bill Schilit who introduced the Invisible Computing column in 2003 [2].

Some years ago in 2006 Yvonne Rogers presented her view on how Ubicomp is going forward [3] contrasting it to Weiser’s Vision of calm computing. In her paper she introduces an alternative agenda that argue that we should engage people by ubicomp technologies rather than to make life easy, convenient and calm. Yvonne’s paper is an interesting starting point for getting students into this topic.

[1] Schmidt, A. 2010. Ubiquitous Computing: Are We There Yet? Computer 43, 2 (Feb. 2010), 95-97. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MC.2010.54

[2] Schilit, B. N. 2003. Mega-Utilities Drive Invisible Technologies. Computer 36, 2 (Feb. 2003), 97-99. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MC.2003.1178056

[3] Yvonne Rogers: Moving on from Weiser’s Vision of Calm Computing: Engaging UbiComp Experiences. Ubicomp 2006: 404-421

>Ubiquitous Computing – Ever wondered if we are there yet?

>Given the technologies around us I sometimes wonder how close we are to a vision of ubiquitous computing. In this month IEEE Computer Invisible Computing column I had the pleasure to ask this question and share my view on it.

The short answer is: many technologies are ubiquitous but there is a lot more to come. In particular we see that many technologies (public displays, people centric sensing, and personal memory devices) are just around the corner and that they may have a large impact on how we perceive computing. For the long answer have a look at my article: ubiquitous computing – are we there yet? [1]. I have taken over responsibility for the invisible computing column from Bill Schilit who introduced the Invisible Computing column in 2003 [2].

Some years ago in 2006 Yvonne Rogers presented her view on how Ubicomp is going forward [3] contrasting it to Weiser’s Vision of calm computing. In her paper she introduces an alternative agenda that argue that we should engage people by ubicomp technologies rather than to make life easy, convenient and calm. Yvonne’s paper is an interesting starting point for getting students into this topic.

[1] Schmidt, A. 2010. Ubiquitous Computing: Are We There Yet? Computer 43, 2 (Feb. 2010), 95-97. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MC.2010.54

[2] Schilit, B. N. 2003. Mega-Utilities Drive Invisible Technologies. Computer 36, 2 (Feb. 2003), 97-99. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MC.2003.1178056

[3] Yvonne Rogers: Moving on from Weiser’s Vision of Calm Computing: Engaging UbiComp Experiences. Ubicomp 2006: 404-421

Ubiquitous Computing – Ever wondered if we are there yet?

Given the technologies around us I sometimes wonder how close we are to a vision of ubiquitous computing. In this month IEEE Computer Invisible Computing column I had the pleasure to ask this question and share my view on it.

The short answer is: many technologies are ubiquitous but there is a lot more to come. In particular we see that many technologies (public displays, people centric sensing, and personal memory devices) are just around the corner and that they may have a large impact on how we perceive computing. For the long answer have a look at my article: ubiquitous computing – are we there yet? [1]. I have taken over responsibility for the invisible computing column from Bill Schilit who introduced the Invisible Computing column in 2003 [2].

Some years ago in 2006 Yvonne Rogers presented her view on how Ubicomp is going forward [3] contrasting it to Weiser’s Vision of calm computing. In her paper she introduces an alternative agenda that argue that we should engage people by ubicomp technologies rather than to make life easy, convenient and calm. Yvonne’s paper is an interesting starting point for getting students into this topic.

[1] Schmidt, A. 2010. Ubiquitous Computing: Are We There Yet? Computer 43, 2 (Feb. 2010), 95-97. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MC.2010.54

[2] Schilit, B. N. 2003. Mega-Utilities Drive Invisible Technologies. Computer 36, 2 (Feb. 2003), 97-99. DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MC.2003.1178056

[3] Yvonne Rogers: Moving on from Weiser’s Vision of Calm Computing: Engaging UbiComp Experiences. Ubicomp 2006: 404-421

Books – Christmas break reading

While travelling I came across two very different books. On one of the airports I came through I came across Superfreakonimics by Levitt and Dubner [1] I had also read their earlier book (Freakonomics) as well as The Undercover Economist from Tim Harford – so I got this one. It is funny to read and I enjoyed most of it. The Geo-Engineering statements in the book received quite some critism on the net. So don’t by it for its discussion on climate ;-). Reading the books it seems one gets a good explanation of certain things in the world (and economics) – not sure if this is really true, but it is great fun to read nevertheless. I particular like the argument why emancipation leads to a lower quality of teaching in schools :-)

A very different book (also with regard to the price; its more on a library budget than a casual airport buy), but not less interesting, is “Awareness systems” by Panos Markopolous, Boris de Royter and Wendy Mackay [2]. So far I have had only a quick look at the book but this could be the basis for a seminar in a term to come.

[1] Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner. Superfreakonomics. 2009. http://freakonomicsbook.com/ ISBN 978-0-7139-9991-4

[2] Markopoulos, Panos; De Ruyter, Boris; Mackay, Wendy (Eds.). Awareness Systems. Advances in Theory, Methodology and Design. 2009, ISBN: 978-1-84882-476-8

PS: I came across another book that takes an extreme – but still to some extent interesting – perspective on the German society. The book is called “Die verblödete Republik” (the republic that went gaga). In some parts I was reminded of the movie “wag the dog” – but the book is much more serious about it – providing a lot of references…